Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example
Via Wolfsonian Digital Image Collection

Here are three of my absolute favorite chomolithographic plate examples of sign writing from The Sign Writer and Glass Embosser by William George Sutherland.  It was printed and published by The Decorative Art Journals Co., Ltd. in 1898.

The first example features a range of lavish, decorative sign layouts for house painters and sign writers.  Each has a rich color palette with gold, perhaps to be gilded with gold leaf in final execution.  The second showcases intricate shading and dimensional approaches for adding depth to lettering.  The last piece suggests techniques for projecting and positioning the lettering within a sign.  My favorite is the approach is the illustration of “Lignomur” characters shown with depth, shading and creative bands to hold the letters together.  Many of the specimens from the full collection are striking and should be looked over in detail.

Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example Sign Writer and Glass Embosser Example
Via Wolfsonian Digital Image Collection

Here are three of my absolute favorite chomolithographic plate examples of sign writing from The Sign Writer and Glass Embosser by William George Sutherland.  It was printed and published by The Decorative Art Journals Co., Ltd. in 1898.

The first example features a range of lavish, decorative sign layouts for house painters and sign writers.  Each has a rich color palette with gold, perhaps to be gilded with gold leaf in final execution.  The second showcases intricate shading and dimensional approaches for adding depth to lettering.  The last piece suggests techniques for projecting and positioning the lettering within a sign.  My favorite is the approach is the illustration of “Lignomur” characters shown with depth, shading and creative bands to hold the letters together.  Many of the specimens from the full collection are striking and should be looked over in detail.

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A Victorian style cover of Scribner’s Illustrated Magazine, June 1874. St.Nicholas, Conducted by Mary Mapes Dodge., Vol 1, No. 8, Scribner & Co, New York. Via SVA.

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Crane & Co Gold Medal Linen Ledger and Record Papers. Made by Crane Brothers, Westfield, MA, USA. Via Crane & Co.

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Nathan Yoder has a cool illustrative style with a vintage vibe. Nice textures, cool hand-lettered typography and interesting details like arrows and banners that all come together to scream vintage patriot. You can see his work here and you can get free wallpaper downloads here.

More images inside the post.

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FirstPost_Opener

About two and a half years ago, Megan started this little blog as a way to organize her obsession with all things vintage. Since then, the blog has snowballed with like-minded lovers of ephemera and design, and now includes hundreds of collections of pieces and thousands of images. There’s been tiny bits of change here and there, but up until now, Once New’s flair hasn’t followed its very unique function.

With that said, welcome to Once New! Formerly Vintage Me Oh My, changed because the acronym VMOM just wasn’t that cool. Despite the entertaining list of search phrases people were entering- like ‘me oh my! vintage.’, “my my, vintage’, ‘oh my lordy’ and so forth, we realized it was time.

The goal with the new design is to bring more discoverability to the massive amount of images we have. We were inspired by the idea of cataloging, which is exactly what we’re doing here–so our design elements shy away from flashy details and allow the content to be king.

We have a lot of other new features we’ll be rolling out in the coming weeks, such as a designer directory, vintage seller’s directory, more free downloads, and a continually expanding ‘explore’ page.

Here’s what the new design has to offer:

POST TITLE BARS

Above each post you’ll see a bar featuring the usual info (comments, date posted, etc.) along with some more interesting information designed specifically to make browsing through vintage ephemera easier.

Origin Era

Within each golden stamp, you’ll see a date of origin for the pieces within the post, and a link to the left that will show you more from this period.

Public Domain

Each post will feature the content’s copyright status– the ever-present question when you find a beautiful vintage piece online. They can be public domain, some rights reserved, or modern (fully copyrighted).

EXPLORE

The explore page is hours of fun waiting to happen. With the launch, we’re re-organizing all of our previous collections with more searchable info, so over the course of the next few weeks you’ll find even more content hiding under each category. We’ll also be adding to the search categories shown. Until then, you can  enter just about anything into the search bar (a country, a specific animal, an industry type, etc.). The goal of the explore page is to help spark your search for inspiration, or help you get to what you need faster. Have a specific set of search criteria you think would help? Let us know!

AND MORE

Looking for a designer? Looking for work?

We’ll be launching our new designer directory soon to help pair up designers and clients specifically looking for a vintage style. In the meantime, if you’re interested in being one of the first on the directory, submit your portfolio!

Buy Vintage

Currently, we have a category called “Buy It!” for any post that features an item currently for sale (at the time it was posted). We’ll be introducing a more extensive way to help you hunt down vintage pieces from ephemera to up cycled wood pieces for the ultimate studio space.

WHAT’S  NEXT..

As I mentioned above, we have a few other things in the works, but I’m sure there are great things we haven’t thought of yet! Let us know what you think in the comments below.

We really hope you enjoy the new look and features as much as we do! Please tell everyone about us! The more we grow, the more cool things we can do for y’all!

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Vintage paper dice from an unknown game. You spin the disk and use the number that land below the arrow. It’s clear from the text on the board that it was a dice substitute due to either a shortage of dice or high prices. Creative solution.

The board reads: “Owning to the difficulty of obtaining dice it has been necessary to include this substitute. The small figures represent the first dice, the large figures the second dice.” Image via Delicious Industries.

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I’m in love with the lettering of “Prize Leaf” on this little piece of ephemera! The label reads “Prize Leaf Cigarettes, Sole Manufacturers Redford & Co., Exmouth Street, London WC.” Via Flickr.

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Potter’s Asthma Remedy tin. “For the relief of asthma, hay fever, & spasmodic affections of the respiratory tract.” via eBay.

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Letters ‘A’ and ‘R’ by Josh Reeves. Great illustration with a nice vintage flair to them. Nice textures too. These would make one sexy piece of vintage signage!

 

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Vintage_TradeCard_2Sign Painting Cabinet Card Photography

 

Image Source- Jeffrey Kraus Antique Photographics

I absolutely love the craftsmanship and detail that went into the shop fronts for sign painters.  If you think about their role, their work seduced shoppers in to purchase clothing, hardware, food or perhaps a drink.  I’m also a sucker for cabinet and trade cards, so there you go.  These are perfect if I had an extra $850 just sitting around, which I wish I did.  It appears they were taken in New York City during the 1880s.

I imagine the Lager Bier Restaurant did a fair amount of “liquid trades” with his upstairs neighbor the sign painter.

>> More Photos Inside the Post! <<

Sign Painting Cabinet Card Photography

Sign Painting Shop Photograph

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I LOVE the flourishes on this stock certificate. I particularly like the little rows of dots inbetween them- it’s something you don’t usually see mingled into old flourishes, and, being a fan of PacMan, it makes me happy.

1864 Union Petroleum Co Stock Certifiacte, Crawford & Venango Counties. Incorporated July 16, 1863. Via eBay.

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Aaron Von Freter is an amazing graphic designer with a knack for working with his hands to give that touch of the artist feel. Check out his portfolio.

>> More images inside the post <<

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Genuine and Original Irwin Bits

I discovered this one in the wilds of the Springfield Extravaganza, one of Ohio’s best outdoor flea and antique events.  I love just about everything about it.  The type and flourishes are just right.  I also love the auger and bit illustration and the overall color palette.  Do I regret not buying it?  Yes, but I have a photo.

Genuine and Original Irwin Bits

I discovered this one in the wilds of the Springfield Extravaganza, one of Ohio’s best outdoor flea and antique events.  I love just about everything about it.  The type and flourishes are just right.  I also love the auger and bit illustration and the overall color palette.  Do I regret not buying it?  Yes, but I have a photo.

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The YouTube channel Freemeo has a host of public domain movies fully uploaded and ready to watch. Many of the movies even date back to the 30s, and whether you’re interested in watching them or not, just scrolling through the page provides a ton of beautifully vintage title card illustrations and type. Definitely worth a look!

What I wouldn’t give to get my hands on one of these old booklets! I really want to know what they looked like on the inside. I’m also curious as to who they hired to design these. Was this a common skill? It seems like people back in the 1800s and early 1900s were just born with a natural inclination for beautiful handwriting and the ability to create jaw-dropping typography. I wonder who amongst us still has those inclinations and their ancestor’s skills are just laying dormant in their little minds. So sad. I wonder what these artists would create if they were alive today? I have strange daydreams, I know..but honestly, aren’t you the teensiest bit interested too?

More type to drool over inside the post!

Via Sheaff-Ephemera